Understanding Nutrition Labels with Rajah

Understanding Nutrition Labels with Rajah

Understanding Nutrition Labels with Rajah

The ability to read and understand food labels can be a huge help when it comes to making healthier choices for you and your family. Learning this skill takes a little practice but its benefits are worthwhile and rewarding. Here’s how you do it:

1. Pay attention to the serving information on the top of the label as this tells you the size of a single serving and the total number of servings the package contains.
2. This section of the label tells you of the caloric content per serving. The calories per serving will serve as a guide for how much you want to consume because double the serving means double the calories.
3. It is highly recommended that you limit your intake of these nutrients. Based on a 2000 calorie diet, you shouldn’t consume more than 16 g of saturated fat and no more than 1500 mg of sodium per day.
4. Try to ensure that you get as much of nutrients such as dietary fibre, protein, calcium, iron and vitamins as you can, as your body needs these every day to ensure optimal function.
5. The % Daily Value tells you the percentage of each nutrient in a single serving, according to the daily recommended amount. If you want to consume less of a nutrient (such as saturated fat or sodium), it is important to choose foods with a lower % DV which would be five percent or less. If you want to consume more of a nutrient (such as fibre), seek foods with a higher % DV which would be 20 percent or more.

Additional Tips:
Remember that the information shown in these panels is based on a diet of no more than 2,000 calories a day. You may need to consume less or more than 2,000 calories depending on your age, gender, activity level, and whether you’re trying to lose, gain or maintain your weight. It is also important to consider the ingredients in your favourite perfect sishebo recipe – be sure to read the labels of every ingredient that you add to the pot.

When the Nutrition Facts label says a food contains “0 g” of trans-fat, but includes “partially hydrogenated oil” in the ingredient list, it means the food contains trans-fat, but less than 0.5 grams of trans-fat per serving. So, if you eat more than one serving, you are much closer to reaching your daily limit of trans-fat.

For more lifestyle and cooking tips and advice, click here.

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